Friday, December 11, 2015

RiTUAL Book Show
exhibit December 5, 2015 - February 29, 2016
OVER 200 SINGLE-SHEET BOOKS EXHIBITED
1241 Captenter Studios
Philadelphia PA


2016 NEW BOOKS TO REPLACE BOOKS THAT SOLD

 A Sense of Place 
 

Truth Demands Proof of Truth
 
HOME SOLD


MIND SOLD
reception December 5, 2015
4 - 7 pm
 artist John Krause + Keith R. Breitfeller
Twentyeight (28) books SOLD at the opening reception

Sunday, November 1, 2015

Insects too Lovely to Repel
October 27, 2015 - February 25, 2016
River's Edge Gallery

One of InLiquid's Partnership Project with the boutique, American masterpiece, Bridgeton House on the Delaware

 Delaware River view from Bridgeton House

Sunday, October 11, 2015

THEN & NOW
Opening Reception: Friday, October 9, 2015 | 6-8pm
On View: October 9 – November 1, 2015

CENTRAL BOOKING | OffLINE Space
21 Ludlow Street
New York, NY

Akua Inks second exhibition sponsored by Speedball Art Products, featuring feature two works from (10) selected artists, one representing their past work and one specifically created for inclusion in this exhibition.


Exhibiting artist
Rosaire Appel, Tomie Arai, Talleen Hacikyan, Karen Kunc, James Martin,Pamela Moore, PD Packard, Bundith Phunsombatlert, Miriam Schaer, Robyn Smith


detail shots: 
decorative papers printed with Akua Liquid Pigment on Japanese handmade kozo papers
 
  
 work-in-progress: June - September 2015

Akua Inks Inventor + artist, Susan Rostow, conducting workshop with artist Pamela Moore:


Friday, October 9, 2015

AMAZING WEEKEND
Philadelphia Open Studio Tours POST East | October 3 - 4


Exhibition of the ongoing series, Insects Too Lovely To Repel 
and conducting open workshop on Itajime Shibori: Japanese Decorative Papermaking 
   

STARTLED RESPONSE from the ongoing series, Insects Too Lovely To Repel

During the POST event, I was a guest artist in the Heavy Bubble Head Quarters at 1241 Carpenter Studios, located in Hawthorne neighborhood of South Philadelphia.

All day Saturday + Sunday I had an open workshop demonstrating the 1000 years old method of Japanese decorative papermaking, Itajime Shibori.

Open to the public and free of charge, this well received event was a hands-on experience of expression and creativity through unlimited pattern and color.

I also exhibited a selection of my watercolors from the ongoing series, Insects Too Lovely To Repel. Thank you! Thankyou! to the dynamtic duo Amy Ralson and Mary Gordon, artist members of the heron studios came to install the exhibit. They really were the best - ever!


Stella Untalan's spectacular work lined the hallways of the 3rd floor in the 1241 Carpenter Studios where I held my workshop and her studio was in constant flow of bedazzeled visitors.

Artist Martha Aleo attended my Itajime Shibori workshop. You can find her review of the POST event at 1241 Carpenter Studio October 3 - 4, 2015 here

Monday, June 15, 2015

home is within me as mind
NEW WORK | handbound book


COPIOUS IN SIZE | 30" height x 22" width x 45" open display







Thursday, May 21, 2015



MY FOUNDATION IS SET IN STONE
exhibitng in
    
LOOK AGAIN: ACM Collection Inspires The Boston Printmakers
 exhibition dates | May 17 - September 6, 2015
opening reception | Sunday, May 17, 2015 | 1:30 - 3:30pm 

Duxbury, MA
The Art Complex Museum houses the impressive collection of the Carl A. Weyerhaeuser family, particularly European and American prints, Shaker furniture, American paintings and Asian art.

The artist, Ture Bengtz, founder of the Boston Printmakers and friend of the family, created the original design for the building under Weyerhaeuser’s direction.




Members of The Boston Printmakers, myself included, are working exclusively with The Art Complex Museum(ACM) on the regenerative exhibition, LOOK AGAIN: ACM Collection inspires The Boston Printmakers, that includes prints from Hiroshige, Hopper, Whistler, Rembrandt, Dürer, Tiepolo, Leighton, Kollwitz and our founder, Türe Bengtz

For this collaborative exhibition, ACM’s contemporary curator, Craig Bloodgood, and collections manager, Maureen Wengler, selected 42 works from their collection for response pieces to be created by members of The Boston Printmakers. 


I chose Kenneth Kerslake’s, A Sense of Place, a photo etching and aquatint that he created in 1977. Below is an exhibition photo from The Art Complex Museum | May 17, 2015
Kenneth Kerslake, print on left | my print, on right



Statements from Kerslake that greatly inspired and influenced the process for creating my print, MY FOUNDATION IS SET IN STONE:
 

“Printmakers do what all artists do: create images that reflect their world, project their values and interest in the human condition, and imaginatively explore their visions.”


“In printmaking, the materials promote “process” or the development of a thought or feeling as it is challenged by the materials itself.”


“The prime responsibility of the artist is to transform the ordinary, to endow it with the emotion and visual content – to create an image capable of touching other minds and hearts.”

The Process 
I discovered that the The Brooklyn Museum has an artist proof of Kerslake's print, A Sense of Place (shown below), in their print collection. In October 2013 I arranged a viewing appointment with Alison Karasyk, Curatorial Assistant in American And Decorative Arts, and was brought into the museum's Print Study Center to see the actual print.

Alison Karasyk, Curatorial Assistant in American And Decorative Arts in the museum's Print Study Center, removing the print's protective glassine sheet
Inspiration photo of DUMBO/York Street for drypoint etching that is chine collé'd to the center of, My Foundation is Set In Stone.
Detail of carving bridge for the DUMBO plate using the scribe, a tradional etching tool.
All printing plates are created and printed in reverse.
Finished print.
The Japanese dye, Kakishibu, is brushed onto 42"h x 30"w sheets of 300 grams BFK Rives for the embossed border print. The dye becomes darker when exposed to the hot sun. Dried plants are laid on top of the paper to block the sun, creating subtile patterns on the paper.
 Analine dyes are then poured onto the paper and the excess is rinsed off with water.
The finished sheet after being dried and ready to be printed with the embossing plate.
 Inked embossing plate set up on the press.
 Additional artist proofs of print(s):